Photo by Chad Beck

Photo by Chad Beck

Within a year of releasing their first record Dead Flowers has shared the stage with acts such as, Murder City Devils, The Reverend Horton Heat, The Whigs, and Chuck Ragan. When they aren’t hosting touring bands, they're filling venues with local bands.

Quickly gaining respect as one of the most exciting up-and-coming bands out of Dallas, Texas, they are angsty, aggressive, loud, sincere and simply put- rock n' roll.

While they're certainly not trying to reinvent the wheel, Dead Flowers is comprised of members who's musical upbringings differ in drastic proportion; thus creating a sound that’s beginning to gain notoriety not limited to their city, state, or country.


 Photo by Andrew Sherman

Photo by Andrew Sherman

Corey Howe 

Vocals  |  With power and angst, lead singer and songwriter, Corey Howe belts out the sometimes-too-sincere-of lyrics, telling tales of loss, love, and hope. Whether kissing his mother from stage or being pulled out from the bottom of a drum kit, he’s sure to deliver a striking performance night after night.

 Photo by Rico DeLeon

Photo by Rico DeLeon

Vince Tuley

Guitar  |  Chicago native, and lead guitarist, Vince Tuley moved to Texas to join Dead Flowers, and has provided a dimension of deviant guitar parts that only a son of a Jazz prodigy who is obsessed with Blues and found  his soul in Punk music, could fathom. Not to mention, backing vocals that rival most lead singers.

 Photo by Rico DeLeon

Photo by Rico DeLeon

JAmes Brock

Drums | Hailing from Fort Worth, Texas, James "Jimmy B" Brock is the newest addition to Dead Flowers as of the fall of 2015. In addition to his dynamic drumming style and writing capabilities he also has really really really good hair. Like, the prettiest hair...

 Photo by Rico DeLeon

Photo by Rico DeLeon

Evan Johnson

Bass  |  Classically trained Dallas native, Evan Johnson found his passion in Hip Hop music, yet somehow landed in Dead Flowers, providing a thundering Bass tone, that has come to prove completely necessary and irreplaceable in this band. His understanding of music theory also has certainly shaped the composition of many songs.


For sheer sweaty garage rock 'n' roll prowess in Dallas, it's tough to top Dead Flowers. Led by singer-songwriter Corey Howe, the band's third full-length album, Let Me Be, is a bold, brash follow up to the group's phenomenal 2014 His Blues. Hints from an array of punk gods ranging from Danzig to The Replacements can be detected, but Howe's raspy growls and the consistent, track-to-track greatness lend this LP its own identifiable grit.-KELLY DEARMORE (GUIDE LIVE)

The Replacements are a big influence for Dead Flowers; it's obvious listening to His Blues and even more so on Let Me Be, which boasts a little more than a dozen tracks. The album's mix of blues, folk and punk rock, combined with Howe's whiskey-soaked rasp, also bears traces of Against Me! and the Rolling Stones. But Howe insists it is a coincidence that the new LP’s name is similar to Replacements classic Let It Be. -ERIC GRUBBS (DALLAS OBSERVER)

The guitar just keeps coming on Dead Flowers’ sophomore LP, His Blues, a throughline connecting these 10 tracks, one spilling into another with scarcely a break between. The Dallas band (vocalist/guitarist Corey Howe, bassist Evan Johnson, guitarist Vince Tuley and drummerEd Chaney) cut the album with producer Jason Robert Burt directly to tape over a 10-day span at the Dripping Springs studio The Nest, and such hothouse origins fit these humid, vaguely rustic hunks of rock ‘n’ roll. Howe’s voice breaks in all the right places — just listen to that slow, soulful fade-out of Here I Am — and leaves you eager to dive in all over again as the finale, Room Eight, fades from the speakers. -Preston Jones -DFW.com

Instagram with us

@deadflowersband  #dffe  #deadflowersband